Low-carb adaptation

(Part 15 of 25 in series, M. Eades' Blog)

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/ketones-and-ketosis/lt-frederick-schwatka-and-low-carb-adaptation/

There is an adaptation period that takes place when starting a low-carb diet. Someone who has been on a high-carb diet–the standard American diet, for example–has to metabolize a lot of sugar. All metabolic processes require enzymes to carry them out. Our DNA codes for these enzymes, but we don’t make them unless we need them. And when we do need them it takes a while for them to get brought up to the necessary levels. So, when we’re on a high-carb diet, we’ve got a lot of sugar-metabolizing enzymes kicking around, ready to metabolize sugar. All the sugar-metabolizing pathways are working efficiently.

~ Michael Eades

ɕ

Copper and low carb diets

(Part 14 of 25 in series, M. Eades' Blog)

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/uncategorized/low-carb-diets-and-copper/

Zinc and copper are absorbed through the same ionic channel, and when there is an overabundance of zinc it gets absorbed instead of the copper. […] Certain elements in their ionic form get absorbed through the same channel. As long as these elements present to the channel in a specific ratio, they get through in that same ratio. If, however, there is an overabundance of one, it occupies the channel, preventing the other from getting through and can create an deficiency of the other despite an adequate intake.

~ Michael Eades

ɕ

Metabolism and ketosis

(Part 13 of 25 in series, M. Eades' Blog)

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/ketones-and-ketosis/metabolism-and-ketosis/

If you read any medical school biochemistry textbook, you’ll find a section devoted to what happens metabolically during starvation. If you read these sections with a knowing eye, you’ll realize that everything discussed as happening during starvation happens during carbohydrate restriction as well. There have been a few papers published recently showing the same thing: the metabolism of carb restriction = the metabolism of starvation. I would maintain, however, based on my study of the Paleolithic diet, that starvation and carb restriction are simply the polar ends of a continuum, and that carb restriction was the norm for most of our existence as upright walking beings on this planet, making the metabolism of what biochemistry textbook authors call starvation the ‘normal’ metabolism.

~ Michael Eades

ɕ

Inflammation and intermittent fasting

(Part 12 of 25 in series, M. Eades' Blog)

These posts, particularly the one on inflammation, inspired a host of questions on whether intermittent fasting decreases inflammation. Based on my knowledge of the medical literature on inflammation and intermittent fasting I’m pretty sure that it does. A recent paper presents data indicating that it indeed does.

The April 2007 issue of Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism includes an article on the positive changes in inflammatory markers brought about by the intermittent fasting Muslims undergo during Ramadan.

~ Michael Eades from, http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/intermittent-fasting/inflammation-and-intermittent-fasting/

ɕ

Metabolic advantage

(Part 11 of 25 in series, M. Eades' Blog)

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/ketones-and-ketosis/karl-popper-metabolic-advantage-and-the-c57bl6-mouse/

Instead of looking at the equation as one that can be driven only from the right side, let’s look at it from the position that it may be driven from the left. What if the change in weight drove the amount of calories eaten and the amount of caloric energy dissipated? I can think of one situation where the equation makes perfect sense looked at that way.

~ Michael Eades

ɕ

Eat grass-fed beef

(Part 10 of 25 in series, M. Eades' Blog)

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/good-eating/another-reason-to-eat-grass-fed-beef/

Feedlot operators basically pack cattle together in close quarters in which they stand or lie in manure all day, feed them an unnatural diet that changes the environment within their digestive systems, make them sick, treat them with antibiotics to fight the infections such conditions cause, add growth hormones to increase weight gain a little more, and ultimately slaughter them. Most of the beef you buy has suffered this fate. Even the beef that ends up labeled ‘Organic’ pretty much goes through the same process except it gets fed ‘organic’ grain and doesn’t get the antibiotics or the hormones, which is an improvement for you but not much of one for the cow. The meat from these cattle can still be contaminated since the majority of the E. coli arises as a function of grain feeding.

~ Michael Eades

ɕ

What is the glycemic index?

(Part 9 of 25 in series, M. Eades' Blog)

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/metabolism/what-is-the-glycemic-index/

Scientists have known for years that normal blood sugars follow this kind of rapid increase, slow return to normal curve. At some point someone asked the question: do different foods cause a different curve? In other words, if someone eats a piece of cake does that make a different blood sugar curve than if that person eats a bowl of ice cream?

~ Michael Eades

ɕ

Fast way to better health

(Part 8 of 25 in series, M. Eades' Blog)

When researchers restrict the caloric intake of a group of lab animals to about 30 to 40 percent of that of their ad libitum (all they want to eat) fed counterparts, they find that the calorically restricted animals live 30 percent or so longer, don’t develop cancers, diabetes, heart disease, or obesity. These calorically restricted (CR) animals have low blood sugar levels, low insulin levels, good insulin sensitivity, low blood pressure and are, in general, much healthier than the ad lib fed animals.

~ Michael Eades from, http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/intermittent-fasting/fast-way-to-better-health/

ɕ

How does life fat thee?

(Part 7 of 25 in series, M. Eades' Blog)

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/weight-loss/how-does-life-fat-thee-let-me-count-the-ways/

A group of scientists from multiple institutions looked at a number of other reasons that we could be in the midst of an obesity epidemic that have nothing to do with diet and exercise, or as they call them, the Big Two. They make the case in an paper published online in advance of print in the International Journal of Obesity that so many have so fully accepted the Big Two that pretty much no one has bothered to look for any other causes.

~ Michael Eades

ɕ